How to: Get Kids to Help with Laundry

Let’s be honest, laundry is no one’s favourite chore. The frequency with which it needs to be done, especially if you have a family, can be daunting for many.

Nevertheless, if you don’t tend to your dirty laundry regularly, it will pile up and become a major headache.

The only realistic solution? Set a schedule & deal with it consistently.


When our kids are growing up, there’s so much to show and teach them, it can be overwhelming. Still, an essential value to instil within them is the importance of taking care of yourself.

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The ‘how to care for yourself’ list is long and varied. However, some essentials are: the ability to feed & clean yourself, maintain your health and generally manage your home.

Often, we wait far too long to introduce our children to the reality of household chores. If we want them to understand that laundry, cooking & cleaning are necessary, then why not start early?

Instead of something challenging and foreign they must learn when they eventually move out, it becomes a natural part of their lives.

Instilling a sense of responsibility in your kids can be difficult, especially when it involves non-exciting tasks like laundry. But there are ways around this problem.

Below, we’ll discuss some tips which will encourage your children to help with laundry chores.


1. Make it fun

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Some people may hear the words ‘fun’ and ‘laundry’ in the same sentence and immediately tune you out. But with the right frame of mind and attitude, you can make chores fun for your kids.

Consider playing music while you sort your dirty laundry or encouraging your children to play a game of ‘Find that match’ when helping you fold. By creating an entertaining diversion or goal, you’re refocusing from the manual labour and to an enjoyable, game-like setup.

Perhaps you set up a race to see who can find the most matches of socks or button up the most shirts. No matter what kind of game you set up, by encouraging your kids to see laundry as an opportunity to have fun, you’re much more likely to have happy little helpers.


2. Create a rewards system

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Getting kids to do any kind of chore can be a struggle. So offering up a system whereby successfully completing certain chores they earn rewards, you’re more likely to convince them of the importance of participating.

By rewards, we don’t just mean sweets or TV time. Perhaps with every chore completed they receive a point, and when they earn 15 points, they get to choose a family outing for the next weekend.

Whatever your method of rewarding your kids, it will help inspire participation in the early stages. And hopefully, as time goes on they’ll also learn the inherent reward of a job well done.


3. Set a good example

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This one may seem self-evident but still merits mention.

How can you expect your children to feel the need to do chores if they only ever see one parent, or neither, actively participating?

Sit down with your partner and discuss who will do what – whether that means shared duty for all chores or some sort of spilt.

When they see both of their parental figures helping around the house, they’re more likely to see chores as a natural part of everyone’s life.

By setting a good example and framing chores as a family activity, you can encourage them to join you.


So remember, when you decide it’s time to introduce your kids to chores like laundry, do your best to make it fun, offer creative rewards and always set a good example.

We promise you’ll make your own life a good deal easier as well!


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