How to: Care For Your Winter Coat

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Winter is here – and with rain, mud and snow to contend with, coats and outerwear can quickly look worse for wear. But with a little know-how and TLC you can keep your clothes looking sharp right through to spring.

Prep for the season

If you didn’t clean your coat last winter (we’ve all been there) get ready for the new season with some on-the-spot attention. Check the label for cleaning instructions and, even if it’s machine washable, treat stains individually first. Use a damp, soft cloth with stain remover or soap, dabbing the mark gently to remove.

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Smart storage

When your winter coat emerges from spring/summer storage, hang it properly when you’re not wearing it. Due to the size and weight of winter coats, it’s better to store them on a padded or sturdy wooden hanger than throwing over a coat hook (which can damage the wall, as well as your coat).

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Machine washing winter coats

If your coat is machine-washable, make sure you carry out these pre-wash checks. After pre-treating stains, fasten buttons and close zips, check the care label to see if the coat needs to be washed inside out and pop it inside a laundry bag or pillow case to prevent snagging. Wash it with similar materials; a few towels or sheets will protect it. Most machine-washable coats will look best after a cool wash with a short cycle.

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Washing parka and puffer coats

Your parka or puffer can usually go in the machine. These winter coats benefit from two or three washes per season to keep their shape and heat-giving properties intact. Check the label, but a parker or puffer may be suitable for tumble-drying: drying on a low heat helps to redistribute the filling and prevent mildew.

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Freshen your fleece

Most fleece jackets are machine washable at low temperatures – but watch out for lint, particularly from cotton. As fleece is a lint-magnet, wash and dry it separately.

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Cleaning leather, suede and fur

When it comes to leather, suede and fur (real or faux), professional dry cleaning is the answer. Gently grooming your coat, using a special brush suitable for the material, helps to keep it in tip-top condition.

For a machine washable coat with a faux fur trim, there is a way to clean it at home. Turn it inside out (to protect the fur from wear) before putting it in the washing machine on a low heat. Heat from a tumble dryer can damage the synthetic fibres, so the coat should be left to air dry. You can use a slicker brush (with widely spaced metal bristles) to brush out and fluff up the fur to help it dry more quickly and prevent matting. That said, when it comes to fur trim, faux or real, dry cleaning is recommended for the best results

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How to clean a wool coat

Even though it’s a natural material, a coat made of wool also requires structural supports and inner fabrics that are not machine friendly – so it’s time to contact the experts.

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Trust Zipjet with your winter coat

Whether your machine washable puffer needs freshening, or your favourite winter wool coat needs a spruce, Zipjet provides a trusted coat cleaning service (https://www.zipjet.co.uk/coat-dry-cleaning). After dry cleaning or washing your outerwear, it’s individually hung and wrapped in protective, recyclable plastic, then delivered to your door.

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Guest written by,

Johanna Payton

Editorial Image Credits / Shutterstock.com

 

 


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